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Loakal moves from downtown Oakland to gorgeous space in Jack London Square. New pop up location is at 550 2nd Street. Open Tuesday thru Sunday. 1130-530. Find Oakland based artists and designers. Current gallery show features Scott Hove and Jessica Hess.

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via East Bay Express

Looks like Art & Soul is going to be awesome this year, and we’re a part of it. More exciting announcements to come soon!

And this year East Bay Express helped quarterback the event, partnering up with the city of Oakland to bring additional arts programming from The Crucible, NIMBY, Oakland Underground Film Festival, Ex’pression College for Digital Arts, and a slew of other worthy organizations. Not to mention we booked the eponymous EBX Plaza Stage, which will feature DJ Dyloot, Metal Mother, Saviours, Vetiver, Forrest Day, Persephone’s Bees, long-standing local hip-hop group Souls of Mischief, indie fourtet Churches, and Oceanography.

Then of course, there are the tentpole headliners: Luce and Blame Sally will perform at the KFOG Main Stage on Saturday, while R&B singers Kellye Gray and Lalah Hathaway will dominate Sunday’s lineup, under the auspice of KBLX 102.9 FM. Saturday’s lineup also features a Community Unity Gospel Stage capped by the Edwin Hawkins Singers, followed, on Sunday, by the Bay Area Blues Society showcase. It’s a new spin on the usual format, and we’re certainly thrilled to be part of it.

An artist’s rendering of the Warriors’ proposed new arena on a San Francisco pier

via Good.is

Last night I watched my hometown baseball team, the Oakland Athletics, get shut out by their most hated rival in front of a crowd of barely 11,000 people while simultaneously reading news reports about Oakland’s basketball team, the Golden State Warriors, moving across the Bay to San Francisco. I’m not sure I’ve ever felt so personally betrayed by sports.

I’m not even a Warriors fan—an uncle’s season ticket package made me root for the Portland Trail Blazers years before I moved to the Bay Area in middle school. But I am and will always be an Oakland fan, and anybody who’s ever loved a city should be able to appreciate how taking away a sports team strips away part of its soul.

At a news conference yesterday, Warriors owners Joe Lacob and Peter Gruber announced plans to relocate the team from its Oakland arena to a brand-new, privately funded $500 million facility at a San Francisco pier currently used for parking. The site will include restaurant and retail space and will be closer to the region’s wealth, much of which is in San Francisco and neighboring Marin County, and almost none of which is in Oakland, the perpetual underdog.

Logic suggests that moving the Warriors a measly 15 miles away shouldn’t matter to those who already support the team, especially when they always purported to represent the entire Bay Area. But the fact that Lacob considered it so important to leave Oakland, the Warriors’ home for four decades, reveals both a deep disrespect for the community that supported the team and a fundamental misunderstanding of the role of a team owner.

The usual reasons owners move teams to new cities—low attendance or a decrepit arena—don’t hold water in the Warriors’ case. The team’s coliseum is perfectly adequate, and despite losing all the time, they have the 10th-highest attendance in the league. They didn’t need to move, Lacob wanted to move.

It was obvious from his first press conference as owner that he wanted to be in the bigger, shinier city—he took questions in a hotel ballroom in downtown San Francisco, not in the Oracle Coliseum or anywhere else in the team’s actual hometown. And he was surprisingly candid yesterday when asked about the conventional wisdom that the team would attract better players and thus win more games in San Francisco than in Oakland. “That’s debatable, whether this will make the team better,” he told the San Francisco Chronicle.

Moving the Warriors is about image, not results. Oakland is associated with crime and poverty and bad schools and police brutality; San Francisco with great restaurants and expensive real estate and yuppies and hipsters. If you were a billionaire investor and sports team owner, you’d make the same choice.

The owners’ decision is logical but not defensible. Sports teams owe a unique debt to their communities. Lacob and Gruber shouldn’t have been allowed to buy the team if they intended to betray the hometown fans as soon as they had the chance. Oakland fans didn’t buy tickets to Warriors game simply because it was so much fun to watch them get blown out every night. They made the conscious decision to invest in their hometown. Many of them assumed that buying tickets would help improve the city they love. And in exchange, they got sold out by a greedy owner.

San Francisco has plenty of crime and bad schools too, and Oakland its share of great restaurants and hipsters. A city’s image is largely a sales job, and billionaire team owners should be key salesmen. The hundreds of acres of restaurants and shops that Lacob is planning to surround the Warriors’ new home could easily have occupied the hundreds of open acres near Oracle Arena, and they would have made money—anyone who’s ever tried to eat something before a game or hang out afterward would pay quite the premium for some options.

By the time the Warriors tip off in their new home in 2017, the A’s likely will have already fled the East Bay. The Raiders may not be far behind; Los Angeles is openly trying to woo them away. It’s easy to imagine Oakland going from three sports teams to zero in the next few years, hurting a city I love in ways much more tangible than image. I still believe in Oakland. I just wish the occasional billionaire did, too.

Illustration by Art Zendarski, courtesy of the Golden State Warriors

Bay Area folks, don’t forget to mark your calendars for Maker Faire this weekend! Maker Faire is a 2-day event celebrating the DIY (Do it Yourself) Movement.  It’s for creative resourceful people of all ages who like making things.

Here is a vendor list

fiftyseven-thirtythree will be also selling prints at our booth this weekend!

San Mateo County Event Center, For ticket information check out the Maker Faire Website

Saturday, May 19th, 10 am – 8 pm

Sunday, May 20th, 10 am – 6 pm

Hey Friends, we know today many of you are observing May Day, especially in Oakland where there is a General Strike going on.  We are just asking all of you to make wise decisions out there and be careful, for yourself and the small businesses located in areas of protest. We too, believe in the power of the people.  Please don’t lose sight of what we are protesting for.  Have a great May Day out there.

via Good.is

Caine Monroy is a 9-year-old boy in Los Angeles who, like many other children, loves arcade games. For some kids, that love prompts frequent trips to Chuck E. Cheese’s or any other place stocked with the beeping and whirring of arcade games. But Caine is a bit more industrious than other boys and girls.

Using a vacant space in his dad’s auto parts store and some of the larger empty boxes his dad’s business accumulates, Caine constructed his own arcade, complete with a claw machine, tickets, and prizes. Two turns on the games costs $1, or, for $2, you can get a Fun Pass, which gives you 500 turns.

Though graduated pricing strategy seems to not be Caine’s strong suit, his tiny arcade remains an inspiring DIY accomplishment. So much so that filmmaker Nirvan Mullick decided he wanted to cover Caine while simultaneously giving the arcade owner the most profitable day of its life. Watch the mini documentary below to meet Caine, see his games, and see what happens when a Mullick-led flash mob unexpectedly floods the cardboard arcade one sunny afternoon.

(04-06) 05:09 PDT Oakland, Calif. (AP) —

The founder of a Northern California medical marijuana training school raided by federal agents says he’s giving up ownership of his Oakland-based pot businesses.

Richard Lee, who has been instrumental in pushing for ballot measures to legalize the drug, says it’s time for others to take over.

Internal Revenue Service and Drug Enforcement Administration agents raided his downtown Oaksterdam University on Monday. Agents also raided Lee’s home.

The purpose of the raids hasn’t been disclosed.

The school offers classes to would-be medical marijuana providers in fields ranging from horticulture to business to the legal ins-and-outs of running a dispensary. It does not distribute marijuana.

The 49-year-old former rock-band roadie and paraplegic tells the Los Angeles Times                       ( http://lat.ms/HqS4PW) he’s worried he could face major federal drug charges.