via PinkNews.co.uk

The Danish parliament has approved equal marriage laws 85 to 24 today, reports said today.

Members of the sole house of the Folketing approved the gender-neutral marriage legislation today after an opposition amendment creating a separate system of marriage for gay couples under different terminology was rejected yesterday.

The new law is due to come into effect on 15 June this year, b.dk reported.

The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Denmark, to which 80 percent of the Danish population belongs, will be able to perform marriage ceremonies under the new laws. New rites were written up by ten of the Church’s eleven bishops in a spirit of “good cooperation”, Bishop Kjeld Holm said.

Gay couples will be able to marry in churches of their choice but priests will not be obliged to perform weddings. They would, however, need to help the couple find a priest who would marry them at the church under the new laws.

Kim Klaus Wyon-Sergeant, an editor living in Denmark told PinkNews.co.uk: “Members of the Christian Democrats (a party that is not represented in parliament) plan to sue the state, believing that the law infringes on their freedom of religion. However experts say they dont have much of a chance since the law specifically allows ministers of the church to abstain from presiding over same-sex marriages.”

Denmark’s current system of registered partnerships for gay couples was the first of its kind in the world when it was enacted in 1989.

Manu Sareen, the Minister for Equality and Church and Nordic Cooperation in the coalition government of the Social Democrats, Social Liberal Party and Socialist People’s Party said of equal marriage: “It’s liberalism, it’s diversity, it’s equality, it’s tolerance and it’s so beautiful.”

Mr Sareen announced the government’s intention to legalise gay marriages in October last year.

It’s been 40 years since our beloved A’s brought home their first Oakland World Championship.

Reggie, Vida, Rollie, Sal, Joe, Catfish and the rest of the boys put Oakland in the MLB history books.
The Athletics hadn’t won a World Championship since 1930 when the team was in Philadelphia.
In just their 5th season in Oakland they brought home the Commissioners Trophy, making Oakland
a city of Champions.

This new t-shirt, ’72′, by EBX Loakal celebrates the team who put Oakland on the map 40 sweet years ago.

’72′ is available for purchase at ebxloakal.com

On May 27, 2012 fiftyseven-thirtythree turned 5 years old! We’re very proud of the hard work and diligence we put into everything, but we would be nothing without you guys!  So. as a thank you, for all of your support, we are having a HUGE SALE!

On Monday, June 4th, starting at 12:05 pm pst, we will be rotating styles on sale for an hour, every 5 minutes after the hour. All selected styles will be 40% OFF on our website, fiftyseven-thirtythree.com!

For example, at 12:05 pm pst, we will announce, all Ambition items will be 40% off for 1 hour.  For the next hour, it is your chance to purchase anything “Ambition” till 1:04:59, because at 1:05 pm pst, a new style, maybe “Protection” will be 40%.  This will continue for the rest of the day.

In closing, we here, at fiftyseven-thirtythree, would like to thank everyone for their constant support.  We wouldn’t exist without you.

So let all of your friends know, next Monday is going to be a big day!

LOS ANGELES — One of my favorite music videos of all time is Röyksopp’s “Happy Up Here,” featuring a bevy of space invader creatures attacking a real-world city. They glow and pulsate, and while it’s strangely incongruous to see two dimensional creatures doing damage to a three dimensional space, the results are incredibly addictive to watch.

 

A new post from Design Taxi tipped me off to pop-up card designs by Kate Lilley. These 8-bit cards feature a skull and a space invader and will require a bit of work — colored paper, an X-acto knife and a steady hand are essential. But when you put them together, you’ll get fantastic 8-bit shapes that look a little like the Röyksopp video come to life (albeit on a smaller scale).

What’s cool about these cards is that they’re essentially open source. You can download the templates for free online, which means you can remix them, too, and try your own shapes and creatures or simply mix it up with larger paper and different colors. I could see someone creating an actual space invaders installation designed to look like the original game.

Is it New Aesthetic, or just nostalgia? I remember seeing street artist Invader’s work in different parts of LA, long before the New Aesthetic debate began, and I kept thinking, wow, wouldn’t it be cool if those things came to life?

Come join fiftyseven-thirtythree at SF Carnival.  As one of the Bay Area’s most beloved two-day events, the free, family-friendly San Francisco Carnaval Festival showcases a diverse array of food, live music and activities for all. Revelers are invited to lose themselves among a multitude of booths offering everything from handmade jewelry and international bites to colorful face painting. Additionally, beer gardens will be available for those who wish to indulge, as well as an exciting lineup of live entertainment to be presented on three different stages.

Carnival takes place on Harrison Street (between 16th and 23rd Streets), Mission District, San Francisco, CA  Festivities go on from 11am-5:30 both days.

Pensa’s Street Charge concept lets you charge your phone and have a nice place to set your coffee while you wait for the bus.

LOS ANGELES —Every time I travel, whether that be the airplane, a train or even a bus, I see them: kiosks where you can charge your phone or laptop while you wait for your departure.  It’s a brilliant idea for travelers, who might find themselves between flights in need of some juice.

I’d always wondered why chargers aren’t more common outside travel contexts.  Indeed, in the developing world, I often see them posted in kiosks and markets. But in the US, there seems to be an underlying assumption that you’ll find a way to get more juice.

With smartphones demanding more and more power, we need a solution. Why not charge up while waiting for the bus?

 

Design consultancy Pensa’s new video concept has gone viral for showing how a getting a charge and waiting for the bus might be compatible. With a simple stand to hold your phone and solar energy cells overhead, the Street Charge concept would help make productive use of all that time spent waiting for the bus — time we usually spend swiping and tapping on our phones anyway.

The biggest problem is highlighted by Night Eagle’s comment on their video:

“It looks fantastic but, seems like it would need to be designed a bit more vandal resistant for and urban environment.”

The thin stand reads very much like a concept video, just waiting to be torn apart in real life (not to mention that setting your phone down in an open space is just asking to have it stolen). But sturdy it up a bit, make it street proof and they might just have a winning idea.

An artist’s rendering of the Warriors’ proposed new arena on a San Francisco pier

via Good.is

Last night I watched my hometown baseball team, the Oakland Athletics, get shut out by their most hated rival in front of a crowd of barely 11,000 people while simultaneously reading news reports about Oakland’s basketball team, the Golden State Warriors, moving across the Bay to San Francisco. I’m not sure I’ve ever felt so personally betrayed by sports.

I’m not even a Warriors fan—an uncle’s season ticket package made me root for the Portland Trail Blazers years before I moved to the Bay Area in middle school. But I am and will always be an Oakland fan, and anybody who’s ever loved a city should be able to appreciate how taking away a sports team strips away part of its soul.

At a news conference yesterday, Warriors owners Joe Lacob and Peter Gruber announced plans to relocate the team from its Oakland arena to a brand-new, privately funded $500 million facility at a San Francisco pier currently used for parking. The site will include restaurant and retail space and will be closer to the region’s wealth, much of which is in San Francisco and neighboring Marin County, and almost none of which is in Oakland, the perpetual underdog.

Logic suggests that moving the Warriors a measly 15 miles away shouldn’t matter to those who already support the team, especially when they always purported to represent the entire Bay Area. But the fact that Lacob considered it so important to leave Oakland, the Warriors’ home for four decades, reveals both a deep disrespect for the community that supported the team and a fundamental misunderstanding of the role of a team owner.

The usual reasons owners move teams to new cities—low attendance or a decrepit arena—don’t hold water in the Warriors’ case. The team’s coliseum is perfectly adequate, and despite losing all the time, they have the 10th-highest attendance in the league. They didn’t need to move, Lacob wanted to move.

It was obvious from his first press conference as owner that he wanted to be in the bigger, shinier city—he took questions in a hotel ballroom in downtown San Francisco, not in the Oracle Coliseum or anywhere else in the team’s actual hometown. And he was surprisingly candid yesterday when asked about the conventional wisdom that the team would attract better players and thus win more games in San Francisco than in Oakland. “That’s debatable, whether this will make the team better,” he told the San Francisco Chronicle.

Moving the Warriors is about image, not results. Oakland is associated with crime and poverty and bad schools and police brutality; San Francisco with great restaurants and expensive real estate and yuppies and hipsters. If you were a billionaire investor and sports team owner, you’d make the same choice.

The owners’ decision is logical but not defensible. Sports teams owe a unique debt to their communities. Lacob and Gruber shouldn’t have been allowed to buy the team if they intended to betray the hometown fans as soon as they had the chance. Oakland fans didn’t buy tickets to Warriors game simply because it was so much fun to watch them get blown out every night. They made the conscious decision to invest in their hometown. Many of them assumed that buying tickets would help improve the city they love. And in exchange, they got sold out by a greedy owner.

San Francisco has plenty of crime and bad schools too, and Oakland its share of great restaurants and hipsters. A city’s image is largely a sales job, and billionaire team owners should be key salesmen. The hundreds of acres of restaurants and shops that Lacob is planning to surround the Warriors’ new home could easily have occupied the hundreds of open acres near Oracle Arena, and they would have made money—anyone who’s ever tried to eat something before a game or hang out afterward would pay quite the premium for some options.

By the time the Warriors tip off in their new home in 2017, the A’s likely will have already fled the East Bay. The Raiders may not be far behind; Los Angeles is openly trying to woo them away. It’s easy to imagine Oakland going from three sports teams to zero in the next few years, hurting a city I love in ways much more tangible than image. I still believe in Oakland. I just wish the occasional billionaire did, too.

Illustration by Art Zendarski, courtesy of the Golden State Warriors

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